Changing My Blog to Jekyll: How I Did It

For those who want to make a Jekyll blog.

This is the second of two posts about redoing my blog. This one is mainly for other people who’d like to make a Jekyll blog and are interested in how I did some of the things I did. If you’re migrating from Blogger you’ll find it especially relevant.

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Get Uncomfortable

It’s true: I’m leaving. Misty too. At the beginning of April, we’re putting on our backpacks, finding a highway onramp, and leaving behind the greatest city I believe this country has to offer. We plan to be on the road for a year.

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The Spirits

Anishinaabewaki Immigrant: Part III

Part I: The Language · Part II: The Sugar · Part III: The Spirits

It’s trivially easy to point out that there’s something missing in our culture’s relationship with nature. The evidence is our entire way of life.

But what is it that’s missing, that’s wrong? It’s harder to answer that than it is to know that something’s wrong. If we knew the answer already, maybe we wouldn’t be doing it.

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The Sugar

Anishinaabewaki Immigrant: Part II

Part I: The Language · Part II: The Sugar · Part III: The Spirits

I got invited to Sugarbush by the teacher from the Monday night language table, Pebaamibines (Peh·bahm·ibbi·nehss) or Dennis Jones, a retired professor of Ojibwe language at the U of M. Pebaam is an almost archetypal Native American teacher, with two salt-and-pepper braids, a radiant calm, and a voice that brings to mind an all-cello quartet. In order to counteract this image a little, he tells limitless numbers of bad puns. Each year for the last few years, when it’s come time to start up syruping for the season, he’s packed up a surplus army tent and moved out to the woods, for the duration. But he’s a relative newcomer to this sugarbush; people have been tapping the trees there for forty years.

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The Language

Anishinaabewaki Immigrant: Part I

Part I: The Language · Part II: The Sugar · Part III: The Spirits

  • Now with audio! That was fun to do. Also, my pronunciations are strictly not authoritative.
  • Language note: Anishinaabewaki is Anishinaabe + aki ‘earth, land’.

If you read this blog to find out what’s going on in my life, for a while I haven’t really been giving you much to go on. A lot of opinions, and that’s pretty much it. I kinda like my opinions (that’s why I believe them), but even I get tired of reading nothing else here. It’s much more fun when I can tell a story, and maybe some opinions happen to be part of the story. That way you find out what the heck I’m up to these days, and I know that I took some belief I had and lived it. So I’m going to try to do more of that. Starting right now:

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Changing My Blog to Jekyll: Why I Did It

*or,* Getting Right with Technology.\\ (For those who don't code.)

This is the first of two posts about redoing my blog, although the other one will be aimed at a different audience, mostly consisting of programmers trying to do the same thing I did.

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Indizhaa Iwidi Iskigamiziganing

(I’m going out to sugarbush)

I might have mentioned it, but I’m studying the Ojibwe language. One thing I’ve learned is the names of the months. Or rather some names that some people use for the months, since Ojibwe isn’t one single language but rather a bunch of related dialects spread across a broad area.

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